5 Steps to Handling Query Rejections Like a Boss

photo courtesy I Believe in Story
photo courtesy I Believe in Story

The life of an aspiring author is often likened to living on a rollercoaster. We are inspired to write a shiny new idea, we spend months pouring over said idea, writing and deleting, outlining, drafting, romancing the characters and their story, until we have a complete manuscript. We send it to critique partners or friends or husbands or wives who have no choice but to read. We revise our very soul onto the page and then we seal it in blood.

When all that has been accomplished, and a polished manuscript stares brightly back at us, we write our query. If we’re smart, we spit shine that baby as much as our manuscript. We pour over literary blogs for agent interviews, follow the #MSWL hashtag, make spreadsheets of agents we love who might love our book. Then, and hopefully only then, do we hit send.

More often than not querying results in rejection. Google query stats and you will find numerous blog posts on the subject. It will make you want to delete your query letter and go have a stiff drink in the afternoon.

Don’t do that. Read my guide instead.

Handling Rejection Like a Boss Step #1

Recognize that your query and the manuscript it’s pitching are not perfect, not right for everyone, and in the end, not the only thing in an agent’s inbox that needs attention. Agents have no obligation to you. Accept that and stop feeling entitled. Acceptance is the first step to almost anything. Really, it’s not that hard. Don’t be a whiner.

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To read the full post check out I Believe in Story, the stellar literary blog I contribute to, by clicking on the link below!

5 Steps to Handling Query Rejections Like a Boss

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3 thoughts on “5 Steps to Handling Query Rejections Like a Boss

  1. I love this, Rebekah! Getting over ourselves as writers is such a challenge, but an integral step in being happy as a writer and in finding representation (and a publisher and eventually readers!).

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